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Elements effecting the seashore

 
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Kate



Joined: 24 Oct 2004
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Tue Nov 02, 2004 9:50 pm    Post subject: Elements effecting the seashore Reply with quote

It is indeed a remarkably hostile place to survive. I wondered what the range of conditions was:

It has been

mentioned about the Temperature differences between summer and winter.

There is also temp differences between high tide

(stable sea temp range) and low tide (wide air temp range)

In seawater and then possibly exposed to fresh water at low tide in heavy rain is another change I

can think of. There is the effect of osmosis to consider with this one.

just a few for now
Kate
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Karen



Joined: 25 Oct 2004
Posts: 7
Location: Wiltshire

PostPosted: Tue Nov 02, 2004 11:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another I can think of Kate, is:

Rock pools becoming more saline on a hot day due to evaporation only taking

fresh water out and leaving the salt behind in less volume of water.

Also the opposite effect, dilution, in that heavy rain caught in

or run off into a rock pool will cause it to become less saline.

both variations are something the inhabitants will have to be able to buffer.

Karen
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David



Joined: 03 Nov 2004
Posts: 3
Location: Southampton

PostPosted: Wed Nov 03, 2004 12:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wave energy dumping itself on the shore, is something I can think of.

At high tide any waves will effect

only as a surge as they roll over the substrate, but if it is low tide the waves are rolling up the substrate itself.

Very hostile place really (even if it is visited on a

calm sunny day in summer) it needs to be remembered that anything on the shore still had to survive those rough times in order just to be there.

David
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Annabelle



Joined: 03 Nov 2004
Posts: 13
Location: Sussex

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 12:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Litter! plastic bags and other bio or non-biodegradable rubbish
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administration
Site Admin


Joined: 24 Oct 2004
Posts: 47
Location: Nearwater

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Inconsiderate human interaction.

From exploring (mostly eager tourists) under rocks they are sometimes

left inverted (the rocks not the tourists) to the sun and so exposing the previously sheltered inhabitants to the heat.

Also when rocks are placed back right way

up, there is often something that gets crushed as it is lowered down.

Not sure this interaction is hugely devestating, but it is an element that effects to some

extent.

Stephen


Last edited by administration on Sun Dec 05, 2004 12:56 am; edited 1 time in total
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Susie



Joined: 07 Nov 2004
Posts: 8
Location: Cornwall

PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2004 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Still inconsiderate human intervention:

REMOVING SEAWEED in summer to

make beaches pretty for tourists. This must affect the natural life cycles somehow on the strandline etc.

Susi Cool
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shelley



Joined: 22 Nov 2004
Posts: 7
Location: Plymouth

PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2004 11:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Light variations....
it was mentioned in 'where they live, boffin' that red light in the littoral zone varies from full

intensity (when the tide is fallen) and zero when the tide has risen around 5 meters (based on 70% loss/meter).

5m is not deep for total dissapearence so must

be a factor effecting the seashore.

Shelley Cool
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Dave



Joined: 05 Nov 2004
Posts: 10
Location: Bristol

PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2004 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hard and Soft Engineering:

man made sea walls and sea defence schemes effect the coast just along from

where it was protected! Erosion and longshore drift that would have otherwise ruined settlements can be halted by these schemes so at

first seem good. But when you look down the coast, the eroded substrate that would have been deposited is no longer available and so the shores down current are

adversly affected (wildlife wise).
Dave
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Site Admin


Joined: 24 Oct 2004
Posts: 47
Location: Nearwater

PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2004 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pressure variations in water column

All know that the tide rises and falls but with this comes the physics of

pressure variations that anything living their must be able to adapt or bear this range.

P=pressure in Bars (our atmosphere in air is

average of 1)
d=depth of water in meters

P=(d/10)+1

so at low tide (exposed to air): d=0
P=(0/10)+1
P=1

& at high tide (take a 5

meter Neap Tide): d=5
P=(5/10)+1
P=1.5

A 50% increase then 50% decrease is a signicant

amount of pressure variation to deal with twice a day.
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Site Admin


Joined: 24 Oct 2004
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Location: Nearwater

PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2005 12:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Geology of the insitu rock make up.

Limpets are grasers, and I know in agriculture that soil make up

(geology of local rocks) affects the soil, which influences what can be grown and wether it is more acid or alkaline. So algae on rocks

must grow with different 'flavours' and so the grasers will carry a variety of influences through the food chain.

Always here of rocky shores, but seldom (if at all

really) hear of differences between alkaline based substrate rocky shores and acidic ones.

A bit specific on a subtle difference I know, but thinking in 'usual

manner'!

Stephen
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Abigail



Joined: 04 Dec 2004
Posts: 10
Location: Cornwall

PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2005 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, grazers will be influenced in flavour of body makeup from what they are digesting. So would taste different depending on the algae.
I dont

know if the algae has different flavours depending on geology because they absorb from seawater rather than have routes. But the

chemistry must be effected by the rock minerals so it may well be a factor. Intesting thinking.
Abi
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Site Admin


Joined: 24 Oct 2004
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Location: Nearwater

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2005 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ocean Circulation effect seashores when passing by as a boundary current. The main UK one being the

GulfStream. Without this, things would be a lot different.... a lot colder sea temps on our western shores.
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bethany
moderator


Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Posts: 19
Location: Nearwater

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2005 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Long time-scale sea level changes (not tides).... more to do with:

*sealevel

rises due to sea level rises from the effects of our supposed global warming phenomemnon
*sealevel rises due to landmass sinking from the effects of isostacy....

south west uk is sinking due to scandinavian glacier reduction

the creatures would notice, I'm sure.... especially the ones on the edge of the zonation margins



Bethany
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Kate



Joined: 24 Oct 2004
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2006 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Susie wrote:
Still inconsiderate human intervention:

REMOVING SEAWEED

in summer to make beaches pretty for tourists. This must affect the natural life cycles somehow on the strandline etc.

Susi Cool



Yep would agree - tourism itself, has effect on beaches and the natural eb and flow of the wildlife

environment.
Beach cleaning and the following mass onslaught of tourists to the beach and sea would effect the area, but to what degree, I'm not certain. We may

just be another 'wildlife' operating in the 'same space' and things adapt accordingly.
Kate
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